The 1st Annual 2018 Hoops for Hope Tournament welcomes basketball players (16+ Male & Female), beginner to advanced, to compete in order to raise awareness about Juvenile Dermatomyositis, and to keep Christiana Powery’s memory alive! A portion of the benefits will go toward benefiting the Cure JM Foundation and AlsoTouch Foundation.
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The 1st Annual 2018 Hoops for Hope Tournament welcomes basketball players (16+ Male & Female), beginner to advanced, to compete in order to raise awareness about Juvenile Dermatomyositis, and to keep Christiana Powery’s memory alive! A portion of the benefits will go toward benefiting the Cure JM Foundation and AlsoTouch Foundation.

In February 2005, we started noticing that Christiana was getting weaker. Even minor activities like hanging a towel on the rack after a shower or shooting a basketball became difficult for her. That summer, the doctors diagnosed Christiana with Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDMS), an autoimmune disease that breaks down the blood cells within all muscle system in the body. Christiana's body didn't respond to the steroids and medication from the doctors, and she was hospitalized in September 2005 in Palo Alto, California. Christiana's little body fought as hard as it could, but the disease had unexpected complications throughout her three months in the hospital. We prayed for the miracle of healing, but God decided to heal her in Heaven. On Wednesday, December 14th 2005, Christiana passed away. We are looking for ways to keep Christiana's name alive in everyone's mind.

With that said, we’d like to present to you the 1st Annual Hoops for Hope: East Coast Tournament! The 3v3 tournament will be held at Baruch College in NYC. There will be different divisions starting from high school all the way through adults (beginning, intermediate and advanced). A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Also Touch Foundation, a non-profit fund in memory of Christiana that will then benefit other organizations that focus on finding a cure for diseases Christiana suffered from. Another portion of the proceeds will go to CureJM, a nonprofit focused on finding a cure for Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDMS) and Juvenile Polymyositis (JPM), the rare and life-threatening autoimmune diseases collectively known as Juvenile Myositis. Approximately 2 to 4 children in a million in the United States are diagnosed with JM each year.

At the tournament, there will be a silent auction, concession stand and other options for fundraising for AlsoTouch and CureJM.

Let’s play some ball!

REMEMBER CHRISTIANA
"...the doctors diagnosed Christiana with Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDMS), an autoimmune disease that breaks down the blood cells within all muscle system in the body."
Christiana Powery was like many other 7-year-old children when she first got sick. She loved to play basketball, do gymnastics and watch the popular cartoon “SpongeBob SquarePants.” And she took to swimming like a fish.​​

But then she began feeling pain in her wrists. That was in 2002, and the little girl who loved to do cartwheels and shoot hoops with her dad was steadily overcome by aches in her joints, said her mother, Maria Powery.

“It took a long time for them to figure it out,” Maria said, adding that once doctors determined Christiana had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, they gave her medicines so she could continue to play sports and go to school in Almaden Valley.

But around her 10th birthday, Christiana became weak again. Once again, she couldn’t play. She had difficulty even hanging up her towel on the rack.

“The arthritis was in remission, but she got another autoimmune disease,” her mother said. It took seven months to diagnose Christiana’s juvenile dermatomyositis (JDMS), an autoimmune disease that breaks down the blood cells in all muscle systems.

“Eventually, they found her blood cell levels were at a dangerous point,” Maria said. “She loved to dance and be goofy. … She went from being an athlete to being in a wheelchair.”

The 10-year-old girl wasn’t responding to treatments of steroids and medications that the doctors believed would help.

Because JDMS is rare, affecting roughly three out of 1 million children, Christiana’s team of doctors scrambled to figure out a course for treatment. They pored over research articles and called physicians across the country who had treated the autoimmune disease before.
The fifth-grader meanwhile was also diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, a rare blood condition characterized by formation of small blood clots, causing a low platelet count.
She was hospitalized at Stanford’s Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital for three months before the two diseases became too much for her body to handle. Christiana died in December 2005.